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Press Release :: 23 May :: NCFA calls on Minister for All-Party approach to National Cultural Policy

May 23 2016, at 7.01am


  • NCFA calls on Minister for All-Party approach to National Cultural Policy


  • Campaign believes Dáil Majority will support ambitious new approach


  • Cultural policy must have budgetary resources to make it reality


 

The National Campaign for the Arts (NCFA) calls on Minister Heather Humphreys to adopt a new all-party approach to national cultural policy. The NCFA urges the Minister to submit the long-awaited national cultural policy, Culture 2025, to the Joint Committee for Arts, where it can be discussed and finalised on an all-party basis. The policy can then be adopted by plenary vote in the Dáil.


The NCFA is seeking the Minister's commitment to this inclusive, democratic approach on the same basis as the recent proposal by the Minister for Health, Simon Harris, that a ten-year national health policy should be developed on an all-party basis by Oireachtas Committee. 


A ten-year cultural policy which is genuinely national and which extends to the terms of future Governments, clearly needs to be discussed and agreed by all political parties, reflecting the democratic views of the Dáil as a whole.  A transformative national cultural policy must have high ambitions, concrete targets, and the budgetary resources to make it reality. 


The groundswell of support in recent days suggests that a majority exists in the 32nd Dáil for such an approach. The NCFA looks forward to working with Minister Humphreys, the Government, and with all parties in the Dáil to construct such a majority to agree, resource and implement a national cultural policy for the next decade that is fit for purpose and worthy of the aspirations of the nation, its founders and its citizens. 


/ENDS


Editor’s Notes:


Ireland remains at the bottom of the European League for Government Investment in Culture and the Arts. Council of Europe data shows that in 2012 Ireland spent just 0.11% of GDP on the Arts and Culture, compared to a European average of 0.6% of GDP.  


For every €1 invested by the Arts Council, more than €0.70 returns directly to the exchequer in taxes. For a net cost of €0.30, Arts Council investment generates €2.50 in turnover, more than an 8-fold return on investment.*


Artists work in all areas of society, including the health sector, community development and education. This is possible with the support of organisations such as Create (the national development agency for collaborative arts), Local Authorities, the HSE and the Arts Council.


An estimated 21,500 people are employed in the Irish Arts and Culture sector.


The Campaign

Established in 2009 as a response to the McCarthy Report, The National Campaign for the Arts is a nationwide, volunteer-led, grass roots movement that makes the case for the Arts in Ireland.  The NCFA’s pre-election manifesto included calls on the government to:


  1. Commit to increasing annual investment in Arts and Culture to 0.3% of GDP, taking us half way to the European average

  2. Publish the cultural policy document Culture 2025 in draft form for interrogation by the Oireachtas Arts Committee.

  3. Maintain on an annual basis, the €50 million allocated to the Department of Arts for 2016 commemorations, and ring-fence it for The Arts Council and The Irish Film Board.

  4. Implement tax efficiencies/strategies to stimulate corporate and philanthropic giving

  5. Create a new Arts fund from National Lottery funds.

  6. Appoint an expert panel of Artists/Cultural Managers to function as Policy and Strategy Advisors to the Minister and the Department.


* = Assessment of the Economic Impact of the Arts in Ireland 2011, prepared by Indecon International Economic Consultants


For further information, visit www.ncfa.ie.


For media information, contact: Sabrina Sheehan sabrinasheehan@missionpr.ie

 

Press Release :: 19 May :: Campaign welcomes engagement, but wants solid commitments

May 19 2016, at 11.18pm


Campaign welcomes engagement, but wants solid commitments 

Taoiseach must back up words with investment in arts 

Retaining €50million is first step to sustainable investment 

Irish Oscar Nominee Ed Guiney backs NCFA campaign

The National Campaign for the Arts held a constructive 90-minute meeting with Minister for Arts Heather Humphreys today. We welcome the fact that the Minister took time to listen to our concerns regarding the need for greater investment, policy reform and a strong long-term vision for the arts. We believe it is important that this dialogue continue. 

However, we received no solid commitment from Government to address the serious issues facing the sector. The Minister was not able to guarantee that her department would retain the additional €50 million that went into the Department for the 2016 Commemorations. This additional funding must be retained annually, if the government is serious about the arts. This is just the first step towards insuring that Ireland grows a sustainable Cultural sector.

 

The Taoiseach’s visit to US highlights the huge gap between the lip service paid to the arts, and the reality that Ireland is bottom of the European league table for investment in arts and culture. Launching the Ireland 100 arts festival in Washington, Mr Kenny quoted JFK: “I see little of more importance to the future of our country and our civilization than full recognition of the artist”. The Taoiseach added: “When it comes to Ireland, I agree”. If he does agree, he must back his words up with actions, commitments and investment.

 

Ireland’s funding for the Arts places us at the bottom of the European league table. Council of Europe data shows that in 2012 Ireland spent just 0.11% of GDP on the Arts and Culture, compared to a European average of 0.6% of GDP. Such facts, add to the irony of the government jumping on the band wagon whenever Irish artists win at the Oscars or the Oliviers. The National Campaign for the Artsis calling for the contribution of Irish arts to be recognised in real terms, with real investment.

 

Oscar Nominated Film Producer Ed Guiney of Element Pictures (Room, The Lobster) was part of the NCFA delegation at this morning’s meeting. Afterwards he said Saudi has oil, we have creative talent. For generations we have been punching so far above our weight when it comes to our success in the arts internationally. So it’s now time to mine our greatest natural resource and to seriously engage and fund the arts in order to grow the sector into the world beater we know it can become; a true source of national pride to propel our country and its growth into the future.”

 

Chairperson of the National Campaign for the Arts Jo Mangan said: “As an initial target we should aim to increase arts funding to half the European average. We think that is a modest proposal by anyone’s standards.”

 

ABOUT THE NATIONAL CAMPAIGN FOR THE ARTS

 

Established in 2009 as a response to the McCarthy Report, The National Campaign for the Arts is a nationwide, volunteer-led, grass roots movement that makes the case for the Arts in Ireland. It seeks to ensure that the Arts are on local and national government agendas and are recognised as a vital part of contemporary Irish life.

 

The NCFA’s proposition is to work with the government and the sector to recognise the centrality of the Arts to the future, as well as the history, of our nation, and to achieve an appropriate and functional level of state investment in the Arts and Culture.

 

For further information, visit www.ncfa.ie


Please Sign and Share this Petition for #ArtsDeptNow

May 12 2016, at 2.29pm

Advertisement - We Believe - Preview Image
Advertisement - We Believe - Preview Image

Irish Arts, Culture & Heritage need Adequate Funding and a Dedicated Government Department

Thousands of signatures have been gathered so far on this petition. More are needed. 

We value Arts, lets tell the Government that.

View and sign the petition online at Uplift

TO: MINISTER HEATHER HUMPHREYS

Give arts, culture and heritage the respect it deserves by creating an independent Department and setting a funding target of 0.6% of GDP (the EU average spend on arts/culture). Ireland has one of the lowest levels of public support in the EU.

Why is this important?

Ireland has one of the lowest level of public funding and support for arts and culture in all of Europe. Successive Irish governments claim to honour and take pride in our rich cultural heritage, celebrated artists and world-class artistic achievements but consistently fail to nurture and support the creative community.
The Arts, Culture and Heritage communities have suffered disproportionately under the last government. The impact in the sector, on jobs, community and education as well as on our international reputation has not been assessed in any credible way by the incoming government. We demand a) an independent adequately resourced Department is created b) a commitment to raising funding the arts, cultural and heritage sector to European average of 0.6% c) publication of a national cultural policy that has the endorsement of the community.


Over 7,000 sign petition for dedicated Arts, Culture & Heritage Department

May 12 2016, at 2.26pm


Over 7,000 sign petition for dedicated Arts, Culture & Heritage Department

  • NCFA says Arts will lose out in new ‘Frankenstein Department’
  • Ireland remains bottom of European league table for Arts funding
  • Government chooses Centenary year to downgrade the Arts

The National Campaign for the Arts is dismayed at the creation of what can only be described as a ‘Frankenstein Department’ covering Regional Development, Rural Affairs, Arts and the Gaeltacht. Given the central role of the Arts in our society and the key role they have played in the 1916 Centenary, we are perplexed and angered by this decision. The National Campaign for the Arts calls on the government to rethink this ill-advised approach and commit to the establishment of a dedicated Arts, Culture and Heritage Department.

In just a few days over 7,000 people have signed a new petition calling for the creation of an Arts, Culture and Heritage Department. The petition is supported by a social media campaign with the hashtag #ArtsDeptNow. This is a signal from the Arts community and the wider public that we are tired of being side-lined.  The National Campaign for the Arts believes that at the very least, the government must reconsider the mismatch being proposed, so that Arts, Culture and Heritage are allied with more closely related sectors.

The leaders of 1916 were poets and artists. They understood the importance of the Arts in national life. It is an irony that seems completely lost on this government that they have chosen the Centenary of the Rising to push the Arts further into a corner, and ditched the Heritage portfolio altogether. The Arts need a strong voice at the cabinet table. At the moment, all the Arts gets is lip service and hollow praise when an Irish artist succeeds abroad.

A dedicated Arts, Culture and Heritage Department would offer some hope of adequate funding for a sector that has seen years of cutbacks. Ireland remains at the bottom of the European League for Government Investment in Culture and the Arts. Council of Europe data shows that in 2012 Ireland spent just 0.11% of GDP on the Arts and Culture, compared to a European average of 0.6% of GDP. 

Commenting on the push for an Arts, Culture and Heritage Department, Chairperson of the National Campaign for the Arts Jo Mangan said: “This is a year when the arts have once again made Irish people proud, not only at home with the many cultural events exploring our national heritage, but also abroad with our film, theatre and music talents once again featuring in the world’s biggest award ceremonies like the Oscars, Grammys and Oliviers.  All of the sectors within the new department are important but we believe none of them – and particularly the arts – is served by being shoe-horned together in this way.”

 

ABOUT THE NATIONAL CAMPAIGN FOR THE ARTS

Established in 2009 as a response to the McCarthy Report, The National Campaign for the Arts is a nationwide, volunteer-led, grass roots movement that makes the case for the Arts in Ireland. It seeks to ensure that the Arts are on local and national government agendas and are recognised as a vital part of contemporary Irish life.

The NCFA’s proposition is to work with the government and the sector to recognise the centrality of the Arts to the future, as well as the history, of our nation, and to achieve an appropriate and functional level of state investment in the Arts and Culture.

For media information, contact: Sabrina Sheehan  sabrinasheehan@missionpr.ie


//Ends


NCFA #GE16 Cork South-West Meeting

February 15 2016, at 12.42pm


The Cork South-West branch of the NCFA has arranged a public meeting with Dáil Candidates to discuss party policies on the arts and culture.

Event Details

Venue: Clonakilty Community Arts Centre (CCAS)

Date: Thursday 18 February, 6.30pm SHARP

Join in the conversation at this important event - a chance to meet your local candidates and seek their vital commitment to the arts over the lifetime of the next government.

Please notify us of your attendance at rsvpireland@gmail.com especially where mobility difficulties would require an alternate venue, as the CCAS has a stairs at the entrance.

Please share widely - all arts workers, audiences and artists and encouraged to attend.

Further information

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/NCFACorkSW/

Twitter: @rsvpireland / @campaign4arts


o Be a part of the campaign by becoming a Member today