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Research and the NCFA

  • NCFA Strategy on Research document can be viewed and downloaded HERE 

    NCFA Position on Research document can be viewed and downloaded HERE

     

     

     



  • The NCFA advocates for a better understanding of the value of the arts.  We promote fairness in access to information and knowledge and work to amplify and substantiate this message.

    We have a duty of care, on behalf of our members and supporters, to consider the quality and use of the current knowledge base in Ireland and the wider international research context. 

    The following resource links are indicative of the information available within Ireland and in the comparative cultures of Northern Ireland, United Kingdom, USA and Australia.

    Links are organized by region/country and accompanying descriptions are drawn from the host websites. This resource list is in no way conclusive or definitive but it is intended to give an insight into current discourses and discussions surrounding the complex issue of cultural value. 

    Should there be resources that you would like to recommend for inclusion, please contact us by email with a short description, title and accurate url.



  • IRELAND

    Name: 
    Cultural value, measurement and policy making by D. O'Brien

    Year: 2015

    Description: No matter what the national context, the question of how to understand the impact of government programmes, particularly in terms of value for money, has emerged as a complex problem to be solved by social scientific management. This article engages with these trends in two ways. It focuses on the UK to understand how these tools and technologies are used for valuing objects and practices. By showing the rationality for using these techniques for understanding culture, it creates a link between studies of cultural policy and broader questions facing the arts and humanities. The article’s second contribution is to our understanding of the role and function of arts and humanities by showing, in the British example, how a true understanding of the value of culture is impossible without the disciplines and fields that are currently peripheral to both government social science and, more broadly, higher education in the UK.

    Weblink: http://m.ahh.sagepub.com/content/14/1/79.full.pdf

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    Name: The Arts in Irish Life, a significant report commissioned by Arts Audiences for the Arts Council from Kantar Media (UK) Ltd

    Year: 2014

    Description: The report looks at different elements of engagement with the arts; attendance at arts events, participation in artistic and creative activities, motivations around the arts, and overall attitudes. In addition to updating attendance information which is published each year, the report also updates some of the elements of The Public and the Arts, the 2006 study commissioned by the Arts Council.

    Weblink: http://artsaudiences.ie/2015/01/the-arts-in-irish-life-2014-published/

    --

    Name: NCFA/RedC Survey

    Year: May 2014

    Description: Survey commissioned by the NCFA and carried out by RedC The survey reveals that two-thirds of the public believe that local authorities should provide financial support to fund the arts.

    The survey also found that over half of those who endorse funding by local authorities, believe that the level of support provided should exceed 50 cents per person per week.

    Weblink: http://ncfa.ie/uploads/NCFA_Local_Authority_arts_funding_research.pdf

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    Name: New Arts Council research indicates that Ireland is a highly creative nation

    Year: 04 October 2013

    Description: The Arts Council released new research which indicates that Ireland is highly engaged with the arts as a nation and most people associate the arts with major economic drivers such as tourism and foreign direct investment.

    Weblink: http://www.artscouncil.ie/en/news/news.aspx?article=a55c2e54-07cd-4e37-a54d-b68d6071dd86

    --

    Name: Arts In Education Charter

    Year: 2013

    Description: This Charter places new responsibilities on Government Departments, agencies, cultural institutions and arts organisations in terms of providing and promoting arts education to children and young people. The charter will see organisations like the Arts Council, the National Cultural Institutions, the Colleges of Education and the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment working with both Departments in order to bring the arts into the classroom and learners into the institutes for the arts. 

    Weblink: http://www.education.ie/en/Publications/Policy-Reports/Arts-In-Education-Charter.pdf

    --

    Name: Arts Audiences Attendance Report 2012-13

    Year: 2013

    Description: Each year, Arts Audiences publishes information drawn from the Target Group Index (TGI) Repblic of Ireland research. The report is published with two main aims:
    - provide an overall picture of audiences for the arts in Ireland and to provide arts organisations with figures for attendance at different artforms. This is of value to all arts organisations and it assists the public bodies involved in making a case for the arts. 
    - provide audience insights for arts organisations to help with marketing decisions.

    The report from 2012-13 is available for download:

    Weblink: http:// artsaudiences.ie/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Arts-Attendance-in-Ireland-2012-2013-published3.pdf

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    Name: Here and Now Report

    Year: November 2013

    Description: This piece of research represents a snapshot of visitors at each of the galleries taking part, all within the third quarter of 2013 . The findings presented here are the average results across the 12 participating galleries. However, an in depth analysis demonstrates that there are some characteristics shared by most or all galleries, but that there are also discrete differences which make each gallery unique from their peers – often linked to situational circumstances such as the physical location of the gallery. These nuances have been presented to the participating galleries in detail with accompanying recommendations on how to implement the findings of the analysis.

    Weblink: http://artsaudiences.ie/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Here-and-Now-Sketches-of-my-audience-2013-Public-Dissemination.pdf

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    Name: Early childhood arts

    Year: October 2012

    Description: Following a roundtable discussion involving Irish early childhood arts and education practitioners in October 2012, the Arts Council identified some fundamental steps to be taken at a research level in order to inform policy and provision in the rapidly growing area of early childhood arts. These were: a mapping of the early childhood landscape in terms of public policy and provision in order to aid orientation within the field, especially in terms of where and how the arts might 'fit'; a scoping and audit of current Irish practice in this domain; securing an expert international perspective highlighting the key issues and the rationale for the importance of this work, and setting out the evidence for why this is an area that requires the attention of public policy makers. To that end, the Arts Council commissioned three independent perspectives: an overview of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) policy and provision in Ireland; a background paper on the role of the arts in early childhood learning and development; and an international perspective on best practice in Early Childhood Arts. In addition, in partnership with Irish arts organisations and practitioners, eight documented examples (in various formats) of Irish work have been produced. The three independent perspectives are available to download from the following link.

    Weblink: http://www.artscouncil.ie/en/areas-of-work/early-childhood-arts.aspx

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    Name: Art-Youth-Culture: FYI

    Year: March 2010

    Description: Art-Youth-Culture: FYI was an Arts Council initiative which brought together more than 60 young people between the ages of 15 and 23 to discuss their participation in cultural life and the arts with their peers and key policy-makers during three days of arts-based workshops, discussions, and meetings. Using a variety of artistic media including music, theatre, film and visual arts, young people explored their right to participate in cultural life and the arts, as enshrined in the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child and the U.N. Covenant on Social, Economic and Cultural Rights. The young people shared their experiences, concerns, and ideas with key policy makers and cultural providers through a day-long series of round-table discussions and artistic presentations, the themes and format of which were determined in advance by the young participants. The event took place over 3 days in Dublin. 35 representatives from key public agencies and government departments whose activities impact on young people’s experience of arts and culture attended the event. You can download  the full report here:

    Weblink: http://www.artscouncil.ie/en/areas-of-work

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    Name: Theatre Forum Marketing Benchmarking Project

    Year: 2012 

    Description:
    This audience benchmarking study takes place annually. 2012 marks the seventh year of this research. 43 venues and 16 festivals participated in 2011. This is the only publicly available, comprehensive overview of funding trends from The Arts Council.  It covers every organisation in receipt of annual revenue funding going back to 2003 and compares trends by art form and individual organisation.

    Weblink:
    http://www.theatreforumireland.com/

    --

    Name: Arts Attendance in Ireland

    Year: 2012

    Description:
    The report contains vital information on audiences for the arts in Ireland, by region and by artform to inform arts organisations in their planning and marketing. The report this year (2012) contains more comparative information, so that we can look at trends over time. The report is drawn from the Target Group Index report. Arts attendance reports are also available from 2009-11.

    Weblink:
    http://artsaudiences.ie/reports-2009-2011/

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    Name: Here and Now: an Overview. An exploration of gallery visitors in Ireland. 

    Year: 2011

    Description:
    A Pilot Study by Audiences NI and commissioned by Arts Audiences (Irl). This work brought five participating galleries in the Republic of Ireland – The Butler Gallery, The Glucksman, The Model, Royal Hibernian Academy and Temple Bar Gallery + Studios – together to develop a collaborative research project for analysis and benchmarking, with a view to gaining insight into how audiences are engaging with the visual arts in the Republic Of Ireland and how this information can be harnessed to produce practical outcomes.

    Weblink:
    http://www.audiencesni.com/download/files/HereNow20121.pdf 

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    Name: The Arts, Who Benefits? A New Pact Conversation on the Arts, Inclusion, Equality and Human Rights.

    Year: By Ed Carroll, a Director of Blue Drum and Project Leader, 2011.

    Description:
    ‘There are now conversations going on about how to reset Ireland during this time of troubles.  Many take place out there among ordinary people who don’t make history, but who have to suffer it.  What good is culture and art here?  What role and responsibility can culture and art play there?’ – Carroll.

    Weblink: 
    http://eapnireland.wordpress.com/2011/03/25/the-arts-who-benefits-a-new‐pact-conversation‐on‐the-arts-inclusion-equality-and-human-rights/

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    Name: Assessment of the Economic Impact of the Arts in Ireland – an update report.

    Year: 2011 (2010, 2009 also available)

    Description:
    This report seeks to establish an evidence-driven evaluation of the economic impact of the arts as an input into wider economic policy in 2011. It represents an update of Indecon's previous independent assessment of the economic impact of the arts in Ireland undertaken in 2008 and a more overview analysis undertaken in 2010.

    Weblink:
    http://www.artscouncil.ie/en/publications/research_publications.aspx

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    Name: Cultural Omnivores in Ireland in 1994 and
    2006: A Discrete Choice Analysis

    Year: 
    2009

    Description: This study addresses the effects of the changing social characteristics on cultural preferences of the cultural omnivores in Ireland between 1994 and 2006. Focusing on characteristics of the groups of individuals who attend different cultural events, we explore how individual preferences manifest themselves in choices made about spending the free time in cultural activities, and what individual-specific characteristics influence these choices. We distinguish between cultural univores, omnivores, and gluttons, the latter being individuals who attend many cultural events across genres many times in the year. Our focus on the characteristics of cultural omnivores allows for a look at the democratization of cultural tastes over a period of enormous economic growth and social change in Ireland. We question the hypothesis that high-brow culture is consumed by snobs and demonstrate that the boundaries of tastes across social stratification have been extended and blurred. At the same time, we find overall lower interest in high-brow art in 2006. The paper examines attendance at 15 types of arts events which coincide in the 1994 and 2006 survey: theatre, opera, musical, variety show & pantomime, film, classical dance, ballet, traditional dance, classical concert, jazz concert, rock & pop concert, traditional & folk music, country & western music, literature & poetry reading and art exhibition. We then group these events into four major clusters of events, and divide them into the independent choice groups made by respondents. We use logistic regressions (multinomial logit) to estimate the likelihood of attendance of cultural event by people with different socio economic characteristics, and ordinal logit to estimate the likelihood of the intensity of their participation.

    Weblink: http://grupo.us.es/aeep/WORKSHOP_EGC_2009/Sevilla_09_Gradev.pdf

    --

    Name: Accounting for taste: an examination of socioeconomic gradients in attendance at arts events. ESRI working paper, No. 283, by Pete Lunn and Elish Kelly.

    Year: 2009

    Description: Lunn and Kelly critically examine and empirically test the hypothesis that the strong socioeconomic gradients characterising attendance at arts events result from similar gradients in preferences for the arts, in line with existing theories of demand for the arts derived from orthodox consumer theory. 


    Weblink: https://www.econstor.eu/dspace/bitstream/10419/50015/1/594063019.pdf

    --

    Name: Arts, Education and Other Learning Settings: a research digest

    Year: 2008

    Description:
    This body of research also underlines the fact that the multiple skills and intelligences required to engage in the arts are transferable and extend into many areas.

    Weblink:

    http://www.artscouncil.ie/Publications/Research_Digest.pdf

    --

    Name: Points of Alignment – The Report of the Special Committee on the Arts and Education.

    Year: 2008

    Description:
    A report arising from the Special Committee on the Arts and Education; the committee was established by the Minister for Arts, Sport and Tourism, in tandem with the Minister for Education and Science and consisted of nominated representatives from the arts and education sectors with special knowledge of the intersections between the two fields. The report focuses on arts‐in-education provision in Ireland and makes five key recommendations to improve such provision.

    Summary Guide also available.

    Weblink:
    http://www.artscouncil.ie/en/publications/research_publications.aspx

    --

    Name: In the Frame or Out of the Picture: a statistical analysis of public involvement in the arts

    Year: 2008

    Description: 
    This publication outlines in greater detail the factors that influence participation in the arts in Ireland. It sets out new findings with regard to the effects of a variety of socio-­‐economic and demographic facts on people’s involvements in the artistic life of the community. People with lower educational attainment, social class and income are many times less likely than their fellow citizens to attend a range of arts events, including plays, art exhibitions, music events, and even mainstream films and street theatre. The report also shows that women are over twice as likely as men to attend plays, musicals, art exhibitions and classical music events and to read novels and poetry. Author(s): Lunn, Pete / Kelly, Elish. Dublin.

    Weblink:
    http://www.esri.ie/publications/latest_publications/view/index.xml?id=2501

    --

    Name: The Arts, Cultural Inclusion and Social Inclusion. National Economic and Social Forum (NESF), Report No.35.

    Year: 2007

    Description:
    NESF report on how the arts contribute to cultural inclusion and social cohesion and how this can be enhanced further. While much of this report relates to participation in the arts, and cultural inclusion in general, the Project Team for this report decided early on that in relation to the detail of institutional practice and policy just three main areas of the arts, namely libraries, the visual arts and theatre (both professional and amateur), would be examined. Summary and Full report available.

    Weblink:
    http://www.nesc.ie/en/publications/publications/archived-documents/nesf-publications/nesf-reports/nesf-35/

    --

    Name: The Case for Elitism by Emer O'Kelly

    Year: 2007

    Description: 
    One of a series of pamphlets on the value of the arts written by Emer O'Kelly. These pamphlets are intended to provoke discussion and to focus attention on the crucial role the arts can and do play in our lives as individuals, as members of diverse communities and as part of our wider society.

    Weblink:
    http://www.artscouncil.ie/en/publications/research_publications.aspx

    --

    Name:  The Public and the Arts

    Year: 2006

    Description: 
    A study commissioned by the Arts Council of Ireland to provide up-­to-­date information on the behaviour and attitudes of Irish people to the arts. The study was undertaken by Hibernian Consulting with Martin Drury, independent arts consultant in 2006, and it draws on a survey of 1,210 people at 100 locations around Ireland. The study looks at what people think about the arts, and their behaviour in relation to attendance, participation, and consumption of the arts.

    Weblink:
    http://www.artscouncil.ie/en/publications/research_publications.aspx

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    Name: Study of the socio‐economic conditions of theatre practitioners in Ireland

    Year: 2005

    Description:
    This study was commissioned by the Arts Council at the end of 2004 and undertaken by Hibernian Consulting. The centerpiece of the study was a survey of Irish theatre practitioners. Its aim was to assemble an evidence base on the economic and social conditions of Irish theatre practitioners and to do so in a way that would provide baseline data to allow future comparative studies to be undertaken. This executive summary presents key findings of the study.

    Weblink: http://www.artscouncil.ie/en/publications/research_publications.aspx

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    Name: Auditoria: a review of planning, programming and provision for performing arts venues in Ireland

    Year: 2004

    Description: In November 1999, the two Arts Councils (North and South) set up the Auditoria Project, a data and analysis based survey of the performing arts venues. Auditoria assesses the current state of theatres and performing arts centres, identifies areas for action and details recommendations for both Councils and their respective Governments about funding priorities and criteria for the future.

    Weblink: http://www.artscouncil.ie/Publications/auditoria_report.pdf

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    Name: Irish Festivals, Irish Life: celebrating the wealth of Ireland’s festivals

    Year: 2004

    Description: This independent report was commissioned from Fiona Goh Consulting by AOIFE, the Association of Irish Festival Events, to provide an overview and analysis of the Irish festivals movement. As the first study of its kind, the research process was designed to provide a baseline study of the scale and activities of festivals in the Republic of Ireland in 2002, with specific emphasis on core issues including finances, volunteering, external relations, development and health & safety. In addition to the findings of the postal questionnaire, which were mainly quantitative, a number of festivals participated in research interviews to explore key issues in more depth as case studies. The research provides a unique snapshot of the country’s festivals and illustrates a vibrant and evolving sector run by committed and professional individuals, many of whom work voluntarily.


    Weblink: http://www.aoifeonline.com/uplds/Goh_Final_Report.pdf

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    Name: The Public and The Arts: a survey of behaviour and attitudes in Ireland

    Year: 1994


    Description: The Arts Council of Ireland, commissioned an independent national survey of The Public and the Arts from a research team based in the Graduate School of Business of University College Dublin. The result is a benchmark piece of research on the arts in Ireland. The study was conducted in the context of major initiatives in public policy in the arts: the establishment of a Department of Arts, Culture and the Gaeltacht and the development by the Arts Council of a three-year plan to develop the arts in Ireland. One of the main objectives of the study is to provide a comparison with the data collected in the 1981 survey of audiences, acquisitions and participation. In 1994, information was gathered on a more comprehensive range of live arts events, categories of purchase of arts products and types of amateur activities.


    Weblink: http://www.artscouncil.ie/Publications/The_Public_and_The_Arts.pdf



  • NORTHERN IRELAND

    Name: Older people and engagement in culture, arts and leisure: a literature review carrie dout by the NI Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL) Research and Statistics Branch.

    Year: 2015

    Description: The research was carried out to obtain a deeper understanding of the relationship between older people and culture, arts and leisure. Using existing literature, the research aimed to explore engagement in sports, arts, museums and libraries for older adults. The outcome from the literature review will feed into further research planned in relation to older people and culture, arts and leisure.

    Weblink: http://www.dcalni.gov.uk/cal_and_older_people_-_literature_review.pdf

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    Name: Impact of poverty on Engagement with the Arts in Northern Ireland

    Year: October 2013

    Description: The aim of the research was to obtain a deeper understanding of the relationship between poverty and the arts. Secondary analysis was carried out using the Continuous Household Survey (CHS) and Young Persons’ Behaviour and Attitude Survey (YPBAS) to examine arts engagement rates against a number of indicators of poverty.

    Weblink: http://www.dcalni.gov.uk/index/quick-links/research_and_statistics-3/research_publications/arts_poverty_2013.htm

    N.B. Reports also available for the impact of poverty on libraries, museums and sport. Available at url: http://www.dcalni.gov.uk/index/quick-links/research_and_statistics-3/research_publications.htm

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    Name: Review of DCAL funded activities with a health impact

    Year: July 2013

    Description:  The primary aim of this review was to undertake a thorough data audit of the activities being delivered across all of the Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure’s delivery areas, that had an impact on health. The delivery areas were within both the core of the Department and through most of the Department’s Arms-Length Bodies. The review collected information on activities delivered over a pre-specified time period of 1 April 2011 to 31 March 2012. Data were collected from delivery areas through an on-line survey and case studies.

    Weblink: http://www.dcalni.gov.uk/index/quick-links/research_and_statistics-3/research_publications/review_of_dcal_health_programmes.htm

    --

    Name: Understanding Society: culture, arts and leisure in the UK regions

    Year:  2013

    Description:
    The aim of this study is to explore the level of engagement in culture, arts and leisure across the United Kingdom and to compare if and why Northern Ireland is different from other UK regions. The project involved bivariate and multivariate analysis of Wave 2 of Understanding Society, a major longitudinal panel study of UK households. Publication by Dept of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL).


    Weblink: http://www.dcalni.gov.uk/index/quick-links/research_and_statistics-3/research_publications/understanding_society.htm

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    Name: Social and Economic Research and Survey Programme 2013/14

    Year: Ongoing since 2011

    Description: 
    In 2011, DCAL scoped its future research needs based on Ministerial and Departmental priorities. In order to provide a clearer and direct link with policy, the areas identified for further research are categorised under the Department’s five key areas: economy, education, health, social inclusion and the environment. Led by DCAL Principal Economist, Patrick Neeson.

    Weblink:
    http://www.dcalni.gov.uk/dcal_social_and_economic_research_and_survey_programme_2013-2014.pdf

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    Name: Mapping of accredited museums and science centres in Northern Ireland

    Year: 2012

    Description:
    The aim of the project was to examine the distribution of museums and science centres throughout Northern Ireland, mapped against deprivation, neighbourhood renewal, urban/rural areas and school provision. Forty-two accredited museums and science centres were included in this analysis. Publication by Dept of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL).

    Weblink: http://www.dcalni.gov.uk/index/quick-links/research_and_statistics-3/research_publications/mapping_of_museums.htm

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    Name: An analysis of the creative industries in Northern Ireland 

    Year: 2012

    Description:
    This study looks to examine how the creative industries in Northern Ireland has grown in recent years and compares this to other sectors locally, as well as the creative industries in other regions in Great Britain. Publication by Dept of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL).

    Weblink: http://www.dcalni.gov.uk/index/quick-links/research_and_statistics-3/research_publications/analysis_creative_industries.htm

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    Name: Willingness to Pay Study into the Value Placed on Public Libraries in Northern Ireland 

    Year: 2012

    Description:
    The objectives for this study were to analyse the views and opinions of both library users and non-library users. Through the examination of the various responses, values have been placed upon the amount that individuals are willing to pay and the actual value of the library service to the people of Northern Ireland. Publication by Dept of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL).

    Weblink: http://www.dcalni.gov.uk/index/quick-links/research_and_statistics-3/research_publications/willingness_to_pay_libraries_2012.htm

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    Name: Sport and Arts Interventions that impact on Mental Health: a scoping review 

    Year: October 2012

    Description:
    The research reports on a scoping review of sport/physical activity and arts interventions in relation to mental health, including suicide prevention, in order to identify types of interventions that have proved most successful. Publication by Dept of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL).

    Weblink:
    http://www.dcalni.gov.uk/index/quick-links/research_and_statistics3/research_publications/sport_arts_impact_on_mental_health.htm

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    Name: An Assessment of the Social Impact of Arts Learning programmes

    Year: May 2012

    Description: 
    A Rapid Evidence Assessment (REA) was carried out to assess the impact of arts learning programmes on marginalised groups and families. The main findings are summarised in the document below. Publication by Dept of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL).

    Weblink:
    http://www.dcalni.gov.uk/index/quick-links/research_and_statistics-3/research_publications/rea_arts.htm

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    Name: Experience of the Arts in Northern Ireland: findings from the 2011/12 Continuous Household Survey

    Year: 2012/13

    Description:
    This bulletin reports on the findings from the 2011/12 Continuous Household Survey and includes topics such as:

    · Participation in arts activities;

    · Attendance at arts events;

    · Benefits of attending arts events;

    · Barriers to attending more arts event;

    · Satisfaction with arts provision in Northern Ireland.

    Publication by Dept of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL).

    Weblink:
    http://www.northernireland.gov.uk/index/media-centre/news-departments/news-dcal/news-dcal-070213-experience-of-the-.htm

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    Name: Theatre Review

    Year: 2012

    Description: 
    The Theatre Review 2012, commissioned by NITA and produced in partnership with Audiences NI, represents the first in-­depth theatre specific report on audience attendance in Northern Ireland and a valuable initial step in building up a clear picture of theatre audiences across the country. At least 62,146 households from Northern Ireland, the rest of the United Kingdom, the Republic Of Ireland and internationally can be verified as having booked for at least one theatre event in 2010/11. They purchased 336,456 tickets worth just over £5 million pounds.

    Weblink:
    http://www.audiencesni.com/news/Theatre-­‐Review-­‐2012-­‐launched

    --

    Name: Mapping of government funded arts venues, activities and festivals in Northern Ireland

    Year: 2010/11

    Description: 
    A collaborative research project between the Arts Council Northern Ireland and the Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure. The aim of the project was to examine the distribution of government funded arts venues, activities and festivals throughout Northern Ireland, mapped against deprivation, neighbourhood renewal and urban/rural areas. This research looked at the spatial distribution of arts funding, mapping it against a range of NISRA statistics.

    Weblink:
    http://www.dcalni.gov.uk/index/quick-links/research_and_statistics 3/research_publications/mapping_of_government_arts_page.htm

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    Name: Participate Conference: harnessing cultural value in tough economic times.

    Year: 2009

    Description: 
    Organised by Belfast City Council, the Participate conference was held on 25 March 2009 at Elmwood Hall in Belfast. Speakers included:

    Paul Collard. Can we afford the arts any more?

    John Holden. How we value culture and arts.

    John Holden. The Value Triangle.

    Wolfgang Buttress. Ideas and concept for the Rise sculpture.

    Greg Richards. The public value of cultural events.

    Weblink:
    http://www.belfastcity.gov.uk/culture/participate.asp

     



  • BRITAIN

    Name: Enriching Britain: Culture, Creativity and Growth: The 2015 Report by the Warwick Commission on the Future of Cultural Value.
     
    Year: 2015

    Description: The report is the result of a one-year investigation undertaken by a diverse group of cultural leaders, supported by academics from the University of Warwick. The report argues that the Cultural and Creative Industries are one entity, an ecosystem, which is becoming increasingly important to British life, the British economy, and Britain’s place in the world. It calls for joined-up policy making and a national plan for the sector that maximises cultural, economic and social return. The Commission’s analysis throws down a sharp challenge to all those who value how culture enriches people’s lives and makes a range of recommendations as to how we can ensure everyone has access to a rich cultural education and the opportunity to live a creative life.”

    Weblink: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/research/warwickcommission/futureculture/finalreport/warwick_commission_final_report.pdf

    --

    Name: ‘Impact’, ‘value’ and ‘bad economics’: Making sense of the problem of value in the arts and humanities by Eleonora Belfiore, Centre for Cultural Policy Studies, University of Warwick, UK

    Year: 2015

    Description: Questions around the value of the arts and humanities to the contemporary world and the benefits they are expected to bring to the society that supports them through funding have assumed an increased centrality within a number of disciplines, not limited to humanities scholarship. Especially problematic, yet crucial, is the issue of the measurement of such public value.

    This article takes as a starting point a discussion of the ‘cultural value debate’ as it has developed within British cultural policy: here, the discussion of ‘value’ has been inextricably linked to the challenge of ‘making the case’ for the arts and for public cultural funding. The paper discusses the problems with the persisting predominance of economics in shaping current approaches to framing articulations of ‘value’ in the policy-making context. It concludes with a plea for a collaborative effort to resist the economic doxa, and to reclaim and reinvent the impact agenda as a route towards the establishment of new public humanities.

    Weblink: http://ahh.sagepub.com/content/14/1/95.full.pdf

    --

    Name: UNDERSTANDING the VALUE and IMPACTS of CULTURAL EXPERIENCES: A LITERATURE REVIEW. Prepared for the Arts Council England by JOHN D. CARNWATH & ALAN S. BROWN

    Year: 2014

    Description: Over the past decade, there has been a lively debate over the many ways in which cultural activities add value to the lives of individuals and to society as a whole. Researchers and writers have produced a somewhat bewildering array of scientific studies, evaluations and policy papers advancing various conceptual frameworks and terminology for describing the value and impacts of arts and culture.

    This review, commissioned by Arts Council England, examines two related branches of this literature: 1) how individuals benefit from attending and participating in cultural programmes and activities; and 2) the creative capacities of arts and cultural organisations to bring forth impactful programmes. By and large, the focus is on English language literature published since the turn of the millennium.

    Weblink: http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/media/uploads/pdf/Understanding_the_value_and_impacts_of_cultural_experiences.pdf

    Name: ‘Open Call for Evidence’ from the Warwick Commission

    Year: Evidence submission period: 16 December 2013 to 15 October 2014

    Description: The Commission brings together fifteen high profile UK artists, policy-makers, business leaders and economists. They will explore how England should invest in and engage with its cultural life, question how we define cultural value, evaluate the role of creativity in skills, education and the economy, and investigate the emergent global trend of large-scale investment in culture from rising economic powers. The national conversation on the future of cultural value requires a comprehensive understanding of the current challenges, opportunities and the best ways of dealing with the former whilst maximising the latter. In order to lead to a constructive debate and fresh policy thinking, such understanding needs to be based on insightful research and trustworthy evidence. This evidence includes original industry research and both quantitative and qualitative data, from market reports, statistics and budgets to audience surveys, examples of personal experience and commentaries that illustrate how the worlds of the arts and culture function.

    Weblink: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/research/warwickcommission/futureculture/jointhedebate/callforevidence

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    Name: The value of arts and culture to people and society – an evidence review

    Year: March 2014

    Description:
    The value of arts and culture to people and society – an evidence review, gathers information that shows where the impact of the arts is felt, whilst also identifying any gaps to help shape future research commissions.

    Weblink: http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/research-and-data/value-arts-and-culture-people-and-society-evidence-review/

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    Name: This England: How Arts Council England uses its investment to shape a national cultural ecology


    Year: February 2014

    Description: Responding to the significant debate on regional funding that has been taking place in the sector over the past months, the Arts Council England have now published This England: How Arts Council England uses its investment to shape a national cultural ecology.
    This England restates the principles on which we invest in arts and culture in order to preserve and enhance a National Cultural Ecology across England, and contextualises the current strategy. Four years into Englands ten-year strategy, the figures in this report show that the investment decisions are having an effect, as well as outlining what England have yet to accomplish to achieve their mission to make great art and culture available to everyone in England.

    Weblink: http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/research-and-data/england/

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    Name: ‘Cultural value gone wonky?‘ Digital Reading Network blog post by ‘Simon’

    Year: 16 December 2013

    Description: ‘it is becoming increasing difficult to talk of anything – love, for example – from a space outside of commodity culture’

    Weblink: http://www.digitalreadingnetwork.com/cultural-value-gone-wonky/

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    Name: ‘Cultural value – again,’ Digital Reading Network blog post by ‘Simon’

    Year: 6 December 2013

    Description: ‘The hoary old chestnut roasting on this December’s open critical fire is cultural value. Much loved by those wishing to instrumentalise the humanities, cultural value appears in European funding cfps (last year’s British AHRC had such a call) as a strategy to identify sources of utility through public-funded humanities projects.’

    Weblink: http://www.digitalreadingnetwork.com/cultural-value/

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    Name: ‘Intrinsically cultural value: a sociological perspective’ a mini essay by Daniel Allington

    Year: 5 December 2013

    Description: Art for art’s sake. L’art pour l’art. What does this idea mean for cultural value? It means understanding the value of culture as intrinsically cultural. As not reducible to any other kind of value, that is: not financial value, of course, but not social value either. Not even the emotional value attached to the great (or minor) work by its creator’s many (or few) fans. No. Intrinsically cultural value, if it exists, can be none of those, which are non-cultural species of value applied to cultural artefacts. If it doesn’t exist, this does not mean that culture has no value, but that any value it does have must be of a kind that other things might possess in greater measure. What is this value, then – supposing that it exists?

    Weblink: http://culturalvalueinitiative.org/2013/12/05/intrinsically-cultural-value-sociological-perspective-daniel-allington/

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    Name: ‘An analysis of the macroeconomic contribution of the arts and culture and of their contribution through spillover effects’

    Year: May 2013

    Description: This is a report by Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR) on the contribution made by the arts and culture to the UK’s national and regional economies.
    The report includes not just an analysis of the ‘direct’ contribution of the arts and culture as measured by macroeconomic indicators like GVA, employment and household incomes, but also an examination of the ‘indirect’ contributions made by the arts and culture to the wider economy and to other sectors. These spillover impacts come, for example, through tourism, improvements in national productivity and through the role of the arts and culture in developing skills, nurturing innovation and fostering growth in the commercial creative industries. Quantitative data drawn from these sources, and from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), were used to provide the ‘business economy’ review and the macroeconomic impact assessment of the arts and culture industry featured in the report. The more qualitative intelligence gleaned from our secondary research and from the survey responses of and in-depth interviews with industry participants were used in the analysis of spillovers.

    Weblink: http://www.cebr.com/reports/arts-and-cultures-economic-contribution/

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    Name: ‘ImagineNation – the case for cultural learning’

    Year: 2011

    Description: The Cultural Learning Alliance believes that the arts and heritage have the power to transform young people’s lives. This document sets out how, and why. In it we argue that the knowledge, skills and experience made possible by the performing and visual arts, by museums, libraries, archives, and by heritage organisations are essential to young people’s development. This cultural learning takes place formally in schools and colleges, and informally in the wider world where the arts and heritage offer children and young people opportunities to express themselves and their ideas and values. They are encouraged to explore other cultures past and present, and are inspired to contribute to the arts and heritage that will be created and enjoyed in the future. Children and young people who have access to our cultural riches will be better equipped to contribute to our economic prosperity and social harmony.ImagineNation includes key statistics, facts, quotes and evidence which you can use to make your own arguments to colleagues and policy makers across the learning and cultural worlds.

    Weblink: http://www.culturallearningalliance.org.uk/userfiles/files/FINAL_ImagineNation_The_Case_for_Cultural_Learning.pdfName: The Cultural Value Project

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    Name: 
    The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Cultural Value Project

    Year: 2012

    Description:
    In launching this two-year Cultural Value Project, the Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) wishes to make a major contribution to how the UK thinks about the value of arts and culture to individuals and to society. Recent years have seen many attempts to capture that value in straightforward ways, not least in order to make the case to governments for public funding, but none have commanded widespread confidence. The Cultural Value Project seeks to establish a framework that will advance the way in which UK society talks about the value of cultural engagement and the methods by which they evaluate that value.

    Weblink:
    http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/Funded-Research/Funded-themes-and-programmes/Cultural-Value-Project/Documents/Cultural_Value_Project.pdf

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    Name: The Connectivity of the Arts and Humanities: New Analysis of Missing Links

    Year: 2012

    Description:
    This research examines the role of the arts and humanities in the UK economy. It provides evidence on the connectivity of the arts and humanities, enhancing their understanding of knowledge exchange, the Creative Economy and cultural capital. This brings the multiple connections of the Creative Economy- between arts and humanities research, cultural institutions and the creative industries- into one study. The survey is being conducted by the Centre for Business Research (CBR) at the University of Cambridge as part of a research project on the Connectivity of the Arts and Humanities: New Analysis of Missing Links. The research is supported by the AHRC. Principal Investigators: Alan Hughes and Michael Kitson Analysts: Anna Bullock and Isobel Milner.

    Weblink:
    http://www.cbr.cam.ac.uk/research/projects/project1-35.htm

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    Name: Economics and the cultural sector: can they achieve a more diplomatic relationship?

    Year: 2012

    Description: 
    Just because valuation of the arts is difficult, and resistant to the tools of neo­‐classical economics, does not mean that policy‐ makers should not explore the interactions of markets and culture more broadly. New forms of dialogue between culture and market economics are imaginable. By Dr. Dave O'Brien.

    Weblink: 
    http://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/dave-­‐obrien/economics-­‐and-­‐cultural-­‐sector-­‐can-­‐they-­‐achieve-­‐more-­‐diplomatic-­‐relationship

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    Name: Cultural Value initiative 

    Year: Ongoing since 2012

    Description:
    Blog website with research presentations as well as reflection pieces and other resources and presentations from the workshop, Cultural Value: Developing the research agenda” was a 2-day residential workshop organised by Dr Eleonora Belfiore that took place on the 11th and 12th of June 2012 at the University of Warwick.

    •  Dr Eleonora Belfiore, Associate Professor in Cultural Policy, University of Warwick: ‘Addressing the cultural value challenge: the research perspective’.

    • Rachel Smithies, Director of Research and Knowledge and Dr James Doeser, Senior Officer of Research and Knowledge, Arts Council England: ‘Cultural Value and Public Value: The Arts Council since 2008’.  
       
    • Dr Dave O’Brien, City University: ‘Proving the value of culture: on evidence, quality and the problem of commensuration’.  
       
    • Dr Claire Donovan, Reader in Assessing Research Impact and AHRC/DCMS Fellow, Brunel University: ‘‘Priceless?’ A holistic approach to ‘measuring’ cultural value’.  
       
    • Prof. Gayle McPherson, Chair in Events and Cultural Policy, University of West of Scotland: ‘The Co-­Creation of Public Policy: the use of mega‐events to add cultural value’. 

     

    • Dr Cécile Doustaly, Senior Lecturer, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France: ‘Researching cultural value: the French approach’.  
       
    • Jean McLaughlin, Executive Director, Penland School of Craft, North Carolina, US: ‘Making the Case For Engagement at Penland School of Crafts’.  
       
    • Dr Andy Miles, Senior Research Fellow, Centre for Research on Socio‐Cultural Change (CRESC), University of Manchester: ‘Yartys, Bean Counters and Non Users: Class and the contest over value in cultural policy’.  

    Weblink:

    http://culturalvalueinitiative.org/

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    Name: Culture and Sport Evidence programme(CASE) is a joint programme of strategic research led by the Dept of Culture, Media and Sport(DCMS) in collaboration with Arts Council England, English Heritage and Sport England

    Year: Ongoing since 2012

    Description:
    The CASE programme strengthens the UK's understanding of how best to deliver high quality culture and sporting opportunities to the widest audience, bringing valuable benefits to society.

    Vision: to directly influence culture and sports policy development through the development of a high-­quality, cross­‐cutting, social and economic evidence base for UK sectors.

    Objectives: to understand how far current research and data can address the fundamental questions of value and what drives people to engage in culture and sport; understand what types of data, analysis, research and resources CASE should provide to influence the policy agenda; influence policy research by producing useful data resources and tools for others to mine use CASE data to inform indicators and targets in future spending reviews become a recognised source of high quality culture and sports policy research.

    Weblink:
    http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121204113822/http://www.culture.gov.uk/what_we_do/research_and_statistics/5698.aspx

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    Name: Taking Part

    Year: 2010 - 2012

    Description: 
    The Taking Part Survey collects data on many aspects of leisure, culture and sport in England, as well as an in-­depth range of socio-­demographic information on respondents. The need for consistent, high quality national data on engagement with culture and sport led to DCMS and three partners (Arts Council England, English Heritage and Sport England) commissioning the Taking Part survey, the first of its kind to provide data of this quality.

    Weblink:
    http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121204113822/http://www.culture.gov.uk/what_we_do/research_and_statistics/4828.aspx

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    Name: The Art of the Possible- using secondary data to detect social and economic impacts from investments in culture and sport: a feasibility study

    Year: 2011

    Description:
    Executive Summary, Review of impact research. Assessment of approaches. Assessment of the Guggenheim’s effects on overnight stays. Assessment of the Guggenheim’s impact on Bilbao’s business structure Availability of comparable data in the UK. Conclusions on the using the approach to assess the impact of C&S to 3.8.2 Impact of stadium announcements. Conclusions. 

    Weblink:
    https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-art-of-the-possible-using-secondary-data-to-detect-social-and-economic-impacts-from-investments-in-culture-and-sport-a-feasibility-study

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    Name: Understanding everyday participation- articulating cultural values

    Year: Since 2010

    Description:
    The project originated in a cross university and cultural sector consortium of academic and sector researchers that came together at an AHRC Connected Communities workshop in Birmingham in December 2010. The research proposes a radical re‐evaluation of the relationship between participation and value, intended to re­‐orientate both academic thinking and policymaking. They are interested in what lies behind, and is in the process obscured by, the assumptions of orthodoxy. They argue that the current focus on certain types of participation to the exclusion of others misses opportunities to understand the variety of forms of cultural participation and their cultural, economic, political and social, consequences. Their aim in this project was therefore to develop a programme of research for exploring the meanings and stakes that attach to ordinary, ‘everyday’ participation- to investigate how hidden, marginalized and forgotten value forms generated by mundane, informal practices and engagements might transform our understandings of the creative economy and the role of cultural participation in the creation and life of communities.

    Weblink:
    http://www.cresc.ac.uk/our-research/trajectories-of-participation-and-inequality/understanding-everyday-participation-–-articulating-cultural-value

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    Name: Measuring the value of culture: a report to the Department for Culture, Media and Sport(DCMS)

    Year: 2010

    Description: 
    There has been recognition, both within UK central government and in parts of the publicly funded cultural sector, of the need to more clearly articulate the value of culture. As a result DCMS has established a partnership to co-ordinate a programme of work on measuring cultural value, and to provide leadership. Measuring the value of culture: a report to the Department for Culture, Media and Sport is the outcome of the first phase of this programme. The report explores the debates around cultural value, considering the meaning of culture and the reasons why valuation of culture is such a difficult task. The report considers several solutions to the problem of how to value culture, giving an overview of techniques from environmental and health economics, arts and humanities research and recent studies on subjective wellbeing. Overall the report concludes that, in the context of HM Treasury’s Green Book, the economic valuation techniques supported by the Green Book should be used by the cultural sector when articulating its value to central government. By Dr. Dave O'Brien.

    Weblink:
    https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/measuring-the-value-of-culture-a-report-to-the-department-for-culture-media-and-sport

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    Name: Culture of Innovation

    Year: 2010

    Description:
    Seemingly a paradox exists in the arts: creativity and novelty lie at the heart of all artistic endeavor, yet funders call on arts and cultural organisations to be more innovative. Working with one of the world's leading cultural economists and two of the UK's premier cultural institutions, the report proposes a framework for innovation that can be used by both arts funders and arts organisations. It describes the rich ways that arts and cultural organisations innovate in audience reach, push out artistic frontiers and create economic and cultural value. By Dr. David Throsby and Dr. Hasan Bakshi.

    Weblink:
    http://www.nesta.org.uk/library/documents/Culture_of_Innovation100610.pdf

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    Name: Supporting Excellence in the Arts: from measurement to judgment

    Year: 2008

    Description:
    In July 2007 James Purnell, the Secretary of State for Culture, asked Sir Brian McMaster, former Director of the Edinburgh International Festival, to undertake a review to report on:

    • How the system of public sector support for the arts can encourage excellence, risk-taking and innovation
       
    • How artistic excellence can encourage wider and deeper engagement with the arts by audiences
       
    • How to establish a light touch and non-bureaucratic method to judge the quality of the arts in the future

    Weblink: 
    http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/advice-and-guidance/browse-advice-and-guidance/mcmaster-review-supporting-excellence-in-the-arts-from-measurement-to-judgement

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    Name: The Value and Values of Culture

    Year: 2006

    Description: 
    Proof and evidence. Diversity and distinctiveness. Cultural literacy. By Charles Landry.

    Weblink: 
    http://www.charleslandry.com/downloads/The%20Value%20and%20values%20of%20culture.pdf

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    Name: Never Mind the Width, Feel the Quality

    Year: 2005

    Description:
    ‘Museums and galleries collect more visitor data today than ever before but how much of it gives us real insight into visitors motivations, behaviour, experiences and responses? And how much of it simply ticks a box on a funding form? Commissioned by some of the UK’s leading institutions, including Tate, The British Museum, V&A and the Imperial War Museum North, Morris Hargreaves McIntyre has tackled this insight deficit head on. Our aim was to devise meaningful measures that can actually inform museum and gallery policy and programming. But while we have based these on new models of visitor understanding, this is no academic theory. We’ve devised practical methodologies and tools that measure things previously thought un-­‐measurable. We would like to begin a debate about how we measure the impact and value of museums and galleries. We offer this report as a starting point for that debate’ By Morris G., Hargreaves J., and McIntyre A.

    Weblink:
    www.lateralthinkers.com/nevermindthewidth.html      

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    Name: Capturing the Public Value of Heritage 

    Year: 2006

    Description:
    Key individuals from the heritage community and beyond considered the concept of public value, and how it might be applied to heritage. The concept of public value – what the public values – may at last be one of the keys to a better future for England’s heritage. 

    Weblink:
    http://www.helm.org.uk/upload/pdf/Public-­‐Value.pdf

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    Name: Cultural Value and the Crisis of Legitimacy

    Year: 2004

    Description:
    Why culture needs a democratic mandate. This Demos publication explores the differing concerns regarding culture and the arts between politicians and policymakers as opposed to professionals and the public. It examines how the points of view held by these groups are incompatible, and suggests creating a different alignment between culture, politics and the public ­‐   ultimately resulting in "a democratic mandate from the public". The report followed the 2003 conference 'Valuing Culture', held by Demos, AEA Consulting, the National Gallery and the National Theatre. By John Holden.

    Weblink:
    www.demos.co.uk/publications/culturallegitimacy

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    Name: Capturing Cultural Value: how culture has become a tool of government policy

    Year: 2004

    Description:
    Cultural organisations and their funding bodies have become very good at describing their value in terms of social outcomes. Tackling exclusion, increasing diversity and contributing to economic development are all familiar justifications in grant applications. But by talking in functional terms about the value of culture, cultural organisations have lost the ability to describe their real purpose – producing good work that enriches people’s lives. Culture now delivers government policy by other means. But there is a difficulty with the language of outcomes: artists and institutions do not see themselves as creating outcomes. Cultural experience is the sum of the interaction between an individual and an artifact or an experience, and that interaction is unpredictable and must be open.

    There is equally a difficulty in talking about the intrinsic value of culture, or ‘art for arts sake’. In today’s world it sounds patronising, exclusive and undemocratic. There is now a growing view within the cultural world that new and convincing methods must be found to validate public funding. This report shows how alternative ways of valuing culture are possible, by drawing on disciplines as diverse as brand valuation by accountants and the language of sustainability used by environmentalists. By John Holden.

    Weblink:
    http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/culturalvalue

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    Name: Government and the Value of Culture

    Year: 2004

    Description:
    Britain's Culture Secretary, Tessa Jowell has released a personal essay examining the relationship between Government and the cultural sector. By Tessa Jowell, British Culture Secretary, May 2004.

    Weblink:
    http://www.ifacca.org/publications/2004/05/31/government-­‐and-­‐the-­‐value-­‐of-­‐culture/

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    Name: Cultural Capital and Social Exclusion Project

    Year: 2003‐6

    Description:
    The inquiry proposed to resolve questions and provide the first-ever systematic survey of cultural tastes in the UK. It did so by means of a national household-­based survey of cultural tastes, knowledge and activities correlated with a wide range of social variables (class, education, gender, ethnicity, occupation etc.) This was supplemented by a qualitative study of the subjective aspects of the relations between culture, class, gender and ethnicity on the part of a selection of the respondents to the national survey. The relevance of the household to such concerns will figure prominently.  The project was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council(ESRC)  for three years from March 2003 to March 2006. It was conducted in association with the work of the ESRC Centre for Research on Socio-­cultural Change (CRESC) located at The University of Manchester and jointly managed by The Open University.

    Weblink:
    http://www.open.ac.uk/socialsciences/cultural-­‐capital-­‐and-­‐social-­‐exclusion/project-­‐publications.php

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    Name: Valuing Culture Conference

    Year: 2003

    Description:
    Valuing Culture was an event held at the National Theatre Studio on 17th June 2003, organised by Demos in partnership with the National Gallery, the National Theatre and AeA Consulting. Prompted by the need for a new concordat to be formed between cultural organisations and their funders, the event questioned whether the balance is right between meeting targets for the instrumental needs of funders across a range of social policy areas, and the recognition of the inherent and less quantifiable intrinsic value of cultural activity.

    The proceedings included speeches from the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, Tessa Jowell, and Lord Stevenson, Chairman of Pearson and HBOS and Former Chair of the Tate. Estelle Morris, then newly appointed Minister for the Arts, also made a brief contribution.

    Weblink:
    http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/valuingculturespeeches

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    Name: ‘Measuring Culture: Collecting statistics to prove the 'use' of the arts has been largely useless…’

    Year: 2002

    Description:
    ‘Measuring Culture: Collecting statistics to prove the 'use' of the arts has been largely useless’, says the editor of Cultural Trends by Sara Selwood, editor of Cultural Trends. The gathering of evidence about the impact of the arts has assumed centre-stage in cultural policy. The rise of statistics has paralleled an extension of government control over the arts, and the tendency to value culture for its 'impact' rather than its intrinsic value. From 1998, New Labour attempted to bring the cultural sector in line with its manifesto commitments, particularly around social inclusion. And the Department for Culture's sponsored bodies are expected to produce evidence of their contributions to that agenda. But much of the data produced is methodologically  flawed, and says more about policy intentions than about actual impact. Until the collection and analysis of data is carried out more objectively, and evidence gathered used more constructively, it could be argued that collecting data has been a relatively spurious exercise.

    Weblink:
    http://www.spiked-online.com/articles/00000006DBAF.htm

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    Name: Francois Matarasso

    Year: Ongoing

    Description: 
    Blog. ‘My writing, research and work in community art all rests on the belief that everyone has the right to create art and to share the result, as well as enjoy and participate in the creations of others. Shaping your own cultural identity – and having it recognised by others – is central to human dignity and growth. If people can’t represent themselves culturally how can they do so in any other way, including politically? If people are only imagined and portrayed by others, how can they be full, free and equal members of society? And yet, in every society, people’s access to culture is very uneven. Those who identify with dominant cultures have no difficulty creating and promoting their values. Others, passively or actively denied cultural resources, platforms and legitimacy, remain on the margins. My work engages with those issues through research, support for cultural groups and writing. This site is gradually becoming home to books, research, essays and talks; all the material is freely available for download’ – Matarasso.

    Weblink:
    http://parliamentofdreams.com/about/

     



  • EUROPE

    Name: 
    The Ecology of Culture report by John Holden

    Year: 2015

    Description: The report examines the interdependencies of publicly funded culture, commercial culture and homemade culture that interact and “shape the demand for and production of arts and cultural offerings”. Written by John Holden, Visiting Professor at City University, London, the report – The Ecology of Culture – argues that the UK’s ‘cultural ecology’ is intensively interlinked, with many strengths, but also points of vulnerability. Based on interviews with 38 cultural practitioners and experts from across the cultural field, the report covers a wide variety of cultural forms, including the visual arts, dance, fashion, choral music, popular music, and film.

    Weblink: http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/News-and-Events/News/Pages/Report-on-the-ecology-of-culture-launched.aspx
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    Name: The Value of Culture by Arts Flanders

    Year: January 2015

    Description: In various countries within Europe, there is discussion about governmental investment in the arts and culture. While traditional arguments are losing potency, and the debate is continually becoming carried out more in economic and statistical terms, the work field as well as the cultural policymakers are feeling an increasing need for a new dialog on the place of the arts and culture within a community. In the last years in Flanders, this debate has been fuelled by 'The Value of Culture', an investigative report, in which Pascal Gielen (along with a team of sociologists, economists, philosophers and psychologists from the Rijksuniversiteit of Groningen) assembled a series of research results on the value, meaning and impact of the arts and culture on people within the community.

    The publication, 'The Value of Culture', can be downloaded free of charge from the same site. The debate on 17 February is shared publically with the IETM Satellite meeting, 'The art of valuing: between evident and evidence-based', a two-day seminar on the value of culture, geared towards policymakers (Ministries, foundations, arts councils) from around Europe, Australia and Canada. The intention is to collaborate on new models in order to make the value of culture visible and to take initiatives for a more cultural fulfilment of policy, both at the national and European level.

    Weblink: http://www.kunsten.be/?p=137

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    Name: ENCATC unveils Journal of Cultural Management and Policy Vol. 4, Issue 1

    Year: January 2015

    Description: With this latest issue, ENCATC continues its commitment to stimulate the debate on the topics of cultural management and cultural policy among researchers, academics, scholars, professionals and policy makers.

    “With this fourth issue we are very proud to see the ENCATC Journal continue to flourish. The increasing interest in the publication demonstrates the need to align education in cultural management and cultural policy with research being conducted in the field. Furthermore, for the long-term sustainability of the sector, this publication is a crucial tool for better anticipating the future and better understanding the past by promoting access to cutting-edge research. This important achievement was made possible thanks to the authors, editors, advisory board, and guest reviewers who are renowned experts and contributed to the success of this issue,” said GiannaLia Cogliandro Beyens, ENCATC’s General Secretary at the occasion of the launch of this new issue.

    The latest issue includes seven articles covering cultural management and policy topics by authors in Belgium, China, Estonia, Portugal, Spain, Taiwan and the United States. The Journal’s opening debate article “Cultural heritage policies as a tool for development: discourse or harmony?” was written by Sigrid Van der Auwera from the University of Antwerp and ENCATC President, Annick Schramme from the University of Antwerp/Antwerp Management School in Belgium. “We would like to feed the debate on whether and to what extent these cultural heritage policies really contribute to sustainable development or whether these policies can only be classified as policy discourse,” said Annick Schramme. The other articles published in the ENCATC Journal focus on topics such as: the critical issues for research in arts management; experimental learning theory applied to the degree profiles of arts and cultural management programmes in Europe; developing intercultural awareness and communication skills in tourism education; the role of social networks in theatre’s audience behavior; the symbolic economy and creative management: cultural and creative industries urging for new approaches; and finally the promotion of digital competences for the enjoyment of culture with a look at new literacy challenges.

    Weblink: http://encatc.org/pages/index.php?id=219

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    Name: Creating Growth: Measuring cultural and creative markets in the EU by Creating Europe

    Year: December 2014

    Description: The study summarizes and builds upon available information on the economic scale of the cultural and creative sectors at both national and European levels. Though there have been many studies on the creative economy, a common definition has only very recently been agreed.

    This report includes:
    • Comparative, qualitative and quantitative analyses aimed at understanding the economic role of the creative and cultural sectors in Europe

    • Key factors that will affect the global evolution of creative and cultural sectors and players

    • Ways by which creative and cultural -activities can help encourage growth, youth employment and innovation and strengthen Europe’s position globally.

    This work, carried out under the guidance of EY teams, has been a collective project, embracing the thoughts and contributions of GESAC and its partners for this study with the common aim of understanding and developing our cultural and creative industries.

    Weblink: http://www.creatingeurope.eu/en/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/study-full-en.pdf

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    Name: IFACCA Good Practice Guide on Arts Advocacy: Advocacy arguments and an overview of national arts advocacy campaign case studies and good practice

    Year: December 2013

    Description: Arts advocacy is a key challenge, one shared by government agencies and arts communities around the world. Based on desk research and responses to a survey distributed in August 2009 to the IFACCA network, this report provides a platform for the exchange of information and ideas about arts advocacy by exploring a range of campaigns currently being undertaken or planned by national arts funding agencies. IFACCA is interested in expanding on the information contained in this report and welcomes case studies or information about other international, national and regional campaigns aimed at raising awareness of the arts. If you would like to contribute, please contact the IFACCA secretariat at info@ifacca.org. IFACCA’s report is the first stage of a research project that identifies campaign success factors, challenges, strengths and weaknesses with a view to exploring the feasibility of developing, with others, a coordinated international campaign to promote the value of the arts.

    Weblink: http://www.ifacca.org/topic/arts-advocacy-arguments/

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    Name: ‘The Public Value of Culture: a literature review’ by John Holden and Jordi Baltà published by the European Expert Network on Culture (EENC)

    Year: January 2012

    Description:  A conference entitled Cultural Governance in a Globalising World: Better Governance for the Cultural and Creative Sector was held in August 2012 under the Cypriot Presidency of the EU. In late 2011, the Directorate General for Education and Culture of the European Commission (DG EAC) asked the EENC to prepare a literature review on the public value of culture. The document resulting from this request includes references to over 50 publications addressing the public value of culture, the intrinsic value of culture and other related notions, including a variety of issues related to the economic, social and political impacts of cultural practice and cultural policy. The literature review places emphasis on publications from recent years and briefly analyses their relevance. An introduction also serves to contextualise and describe the issues addressed.The literature review was prepared by John Holden and Jordi Baltà. It was submitted to DG EAC in January 2012.

    Weblink: http://www.eenc.info/news/the-public-value-of-culture-literature-review/

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    Name: Project on the International Measurement of Culture

    Year: 2006

    Description: The exploratory stage of this project took place 2006/2007 with a mission to examine the feasibility of producing reliable international comparative measures of the culture sector.
 This phase also included assembling initial comparable measures for a sample of five countries and four cities.  The tables can be found in the final report available at the link below. The project held a workshop of international experts in Paris in December 2006. The workshop was held within the context of a new OECD Project focusing on statistical methodologies (definitions, classifications, frameworks, etc.) to measure the economic and social importance of culture and is linked to the organisation’s wider global project on Measuring the Progress of Societies2. The work of the Project is supported by the Louise T. Blouin Foundation,

    Weblink: http://www.oecd.org/std/na/projectontheinternationalmeasurementofculture.htm



  • AUSTRALIA

    Name: ‘The Arts and Australian Education: Realising Potential’

    Year: 2010

    Description: Robyn Ewing’s Australian Education Review MAPS the actual and potential contribution of all the Arts to education. It identifies the opportunities and constraints in today’s landscape of education and schooling, in terms of philosophy, pedagogy, practice and the systems which implement all of these.

    Weblink: http://www.acer.edu.au/documents/AER-58.pdf

    --

    Name: Making Culture Count: rethinking measures of cultural vitality, wellbeing and citizenship

    Year: 2012

    Description:
    Conference held in Melbourne in May 2012, as a joint venture of the Cultural Development Network and the Centre for Cultural Partnerships, Victorian College of the Arts and Music, University of Melbourne. In recent years, culture and cultural development have become internationally recognised as important dimensions of contemporary governance and public policy. As in other policy areas (economic, social, environmental), the production of accurate and relevant data has become central to cultural policy and how the cultural lives of citizens are understood.   Conceptual  and practical developments  in measurement  tools, such as new forms of cultural indicators,  have the potential  to enrich  our understanding  of culture’s  role  in wellbeing,  vitality  and  citizenship.  From  UNESCO’s  benchmarks  for cultural  freedom,  through  comparative  measures  of  states’  cultural  provision  and  creative  cities  indices,  to  indicators  for community arts evaluation, diverse approaches to quantifying cultural value and measuring societal progress now exist. But how useful are all these measures? Are they helping us to keep track of what matters? What opportunities exist to contest, refine or democratise these systems of cultural measurement? This international conference brought together diverse perspectives from international guest speakers and leading local practitioners to explore the burgeoning field of cultural and community indicators. Participants engaged in critical dialogues on various approaches to monitoring, evaluating, planning, advocating, predicting, and simply understanding, cultural and social change. Presentations covered a range of theoretical and practical approaches to quantifying cultural values often considered intangible, including vitality, wellbeing, citizenship, and sustainability

    Weblink:
    http://conference2012.culturaldevelopment.com.au/program/

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    Name: Government of Western Australia, Department of Culture and the Arts/ John Knell Consultation

    Year: 2011

    Description:
    Nationally and internationally, explaining the full value of the culture and arts sector’s activity to the public, government and other potential funders and investors has been problematic. The Department of Culture and the Arts has contracted Pracsys and John Knell of the UK based Intelligence Agency to undertake a ground breaking research project that will support artists, organizations and the Department to create a unified evidence based case on the true public value of the arts. The   Department's research to date on public value approaches indicates that nowhere in the world is there a standard, robust process that demonstrates the full value of the sector. In line with DCA’s strategic plan and Creating Value – An Arts and Culture Sector Policy Framework, we are undertaking to create one. View the transcript and listen to the podcast of Allanah Lucas, Michael Chappell and John Knell’s introduction the workshop.

    Weblink:
    http://www.dca.wa.gov.au/DCA-Initiatives/sector-development/measuring-public-value-seminar/

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    Name: Creating Value – An Arts and Culture Sector Policy Framework

    Year: March 2010

    Description:
    Creating Value articulates the principles, outcomes and strategies that will guide the activities of the DCA for the next five   years. Developed following significant research and extensive consultation with the culture and arts sector and our partners   across other Government agencies and the private sector, the Policy Framework represents a new approach to supporting culture and arts in Western Australia.

    Weblink:
    http://www.dca.wa.gov.au/Documents/About%20Us/About%20Us_Policies_Creating%20Value%202010%20- %202014_2012.pdf

    --

    Name: culture@com.unity:  the arts and cultural domain in New South Wales

    Year: 2001

    Description:
    Keynote Address, ‘Defining the domain – valuing arts & culture’.

    ‘For those of us working in the arts, it’s a very interesting exercise to ask ourselves who cares about what we do? If we     vanished tomorrow what would our constituency or audience miss, and how might this loss affect their lives? What is it about   what we do that people value? What do they want from us and how can we go about responding to and nurturing this   dynamic relationship?’ By Deirdre Williams.

    Weblink:
    http://www.regionalartsnsw.com.au/docs/s-­‐conf/deidre-­‐williams.pdf



  • USA

    Name: ‘Beyond the Culture Wars: A Conversation: why should the arts be publicly funded?’ by J.T. Rogers and Eric Helland

    Year: November 2013

    Description: Playwright J.T. Rogers and economist Eric Helland have been friends since childhood. Rogers, the author of Blood and Gifts, The Overwhelming and other plays, and Helland, a professor of economics at Claremont McKenna College in Los Angeles and a former adviser to the White House under President George W. Bush, found themselves, as they grew to adulthood, engaged in raging political disagreements. One ongoing argument concerns the propriety and the efficacy of public funding for the arts. This is a brief selection from their conversation.

    Weblink: http://www.tcg.org/publications/at/issue/featuredstory.cfm?story=7&indexID=37

    --

    Name: 10 compelling reasons to support the arts

    Year: March 2013

    Description: On Artsblog, Randy Cohen, the Vice President of Research and Policy at Americans for the Arts, the USA’s advocacy organization for the arts, outlines his compelling reasons to support the arts. A member of the staff of Americans for the Arts since 1991, Randy is among the most noted experts in the field of arts funding, research, policy, and using the arts to address community development issues. The following is his updated Top 10 Reasons to Support the Arts:

    Weblink: http://blog.artsusa.org/2013/04/08/10-reasons-to-support-the-arts-in-2013/

    --

    Name: ‘Who Counts? Grappling with Attendance as a Proxy for Impact’

    Year: 16 October 2013

    Description: When you count attendance to your museum, do you include:
    • people who eat in the cafe?
    • people who rent the facility for private events?
    • people who engage with your content online?
    • participants in offsite outreach programs?
    • volunteers?
    • Summertime concerts at the history museum? Those count.
    • Outdoor movies at the art museum? Nope.
    At the St. Louis Science Center, the focus of the article, there was a particularly creative perspective on attendance, including numbers for offsite board meetings, parades where staff made a showing, and attendance at a school next door. The only form of engagement lacking in the article is online participation--which for many museums, could yield the highest numbers of all.

    Weblink: http://museumtwo.blogspot.ie/2013/10/who-counts-grappling-with-attendance-as.html

    --

    Name: ‘The Qualities of Quality - Understanding Excellence in Arts Education’

    Year: 2009

    Description: Many children in the US have little or no opportunity for formal arts instruction, and access to arts learning experiences remains a critical national challenge. In addition, the quality of arts learning opportunities that are available to young people is a serious concern. Understanding this second challenge – the challenge of creating and sustaining high quality formal arts learning experiences for K-12 youth, inside and outside of school – is the focus of our recent research initiative, The Qualities of Quality: Understanding Excellence in Arts Education, commissioned by The Wallace Foundation and conducted by Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The study focuses on the character of excellence itself and asks three core questions:
    (1) How do arts educators in the United States – including leading practitioners, theorists, and administrators– conceive of and define high quality arts learning and teaching?
    (2) What markers of excellence do educators and administrators look for in the actual activities of arts learning and teaching as they unfold in the classroom?
    (3) How do a program’s foundational decisions, as well as its ongoing day-to-day decisions, affect the pursuit and achievement of quality?

    Weblink: http://www.wallacefoundation.org/knowledge-center/arts-education/arts-classroom-instruction/Documents/Understanding-Excellence-in-Arts-Education.pdf

    --

    Name: ‘Learning, the Arts and the Brain’ by the Dana Arts and Cognition Consortium

    Year: 2008

    Description: In 2004, the Dana Arts and Cognition Consortium brought together cognitive neuroscientists from seven universities across the United States to grapple with the question of why arts training has been associated with higher academic performance. Is it simply that smart people are drawn to “do” art—to study and perform music, dance,
    drama—or does early arts training cause changes in the brain that enhance other important aspects of cognition? The consortium can now report findings that allow for a deeper understanding of how to define and evaluate the possible causal relationships between arts training and the ability of the brain to learn in other cognitive domains.
    The research includes new data about the effects of arts training that should stimulate future investigation. The preliminary conclusions we have reached may soon lead to trustworthy assumptions about the impact of arts study on the brain; this should be helpful to parents, students, educators, neuroscientists, and policymakers in making personal,
    institutional, and policy decisions.

    Weblink: http://www.dana.org/uploadedFiles/News_and_Publications/Special_Publications/Learning,%20Arts%20and%20the%20Brain_ArtsAndCognition_Compl.pdf

    --

    Name: Counting New Beans: Intrinsic Impact and the Value of Art

    Year: 2012

    Description:
    Edited by Clayton Lord, with a foreword by Ben Cameron and introduction by Brad Erickson, including the final report  ‘Measuring the Intrinsic Impact of Live Theatre,’ by Alan Brown and Rebecca Ratzkin of WolfBrown.

    Weblink:
    http://theatrebayarea.org/Programs/Intrinsic-Impact.cfm

    --

    Name: Age and Arts Participation: A Case against Demographic Destiny 


    Year: 2011

    Description:
    Mark Stern, University of Pennsylvania, analyzes the relationship between age and arts participation in the Survey of Public Participation in the Arts data for 1982, 1992, 2002, and 2008. The report concludes that age and year of birth are poor predictors of arts participation and that the age distribution of art-goers now generally mirrors that of the U.S. adult population.

    Weblink:
    http://www.nea.gov/research/2008-SPPA-Age.pdf

    --

    Name: Beyond Attendance: A Multi-­Modal Understanding of Arts Participation

    Year: 2011

    Description:
    Report authors Jennifer Novak-Leonard and Alan Brown of WolfBrown explore patterns of arts engagement across three modes: arts creation or performance, arts engagement through media, and attendance at arts activities. The report highlights the overlap in participation across modes, and examines factors that drive participation within and between modes. February 2011. Published by National Endowment for the Arts by Jennifer L. Novak‐Leonard and Alan S. Brown, WolfBrown.

    Weblink:
    http://www.nea.gov/research/2008-SPPA-BeyondAttendance.pdf

    --

    Name: Assessing the intrinsic impacts of a live performance

    Year: 2007

    Description:
    Commissioned by 14 Major University Presenters. The MUP Value & Impact Study was a two-­‐year study of the values and motivations driving performing arts attendance and donation. The study was commissioned by 14 leading university performing arts presenters. To download an overview of the study, including a list of the study partners and a list of deliverables. Wolf Brown.

    Weblink:
    http://wolfbrown.com/index.php?page=mups

    --

    Name: Creating Public Value through State Art Agencies

    Year: 2005

    Description:
    This report by Harvard professor Mark Moore, a leading authority on public administration, offers state arts agencies practical guidance on setting realistic goals, measuring and communicating the public value of their work, and cultivating the support of policymakers. Wallace Foundation. By Mark Moore.

    Weblink:
    http://www.wallacefoundation.org/knowledge‐center/audience-development-for-the-arts/state-arts-policy/Pages/Creating-Public-Value-Through-State-Arts-Agencies.aspx

    --

    Name: Motivations Matter: Findings and Practical Implications of a National Survey of Cultural Participation

    Year: By Francie Ostrower, 2005

    Description: 
    Published by the Urban Institute as part of the series Building Arts Participation: New Findings from the Field and funded by The Wallace Foundation.

    Weblink:
    http://www.southarts.org/atf/cf/%7B15E1E84E‐C906‐4F67-­9851‐A195A9BAAF79%7D/Motivations%20Matter.pdf

    --

    Name: Gifts of the Muse Reframing the Debate About the Benefits of the Arts

    Year: By Kevin F. McCarthy, Elizabeth H. Ondaatje, Laura Zakaras, 2004.

    Description:
    Understanding the benefits of the arts is central to the discussion and design of poli-­‐ cies affecting the arts. This study addresses the widely perceived need to articulate the private and public benefits of involvement in the arts. The findings are intended to engage the arts community and the public in a new dialogue about the value of the arts, to stimulate further research, and to help public and private policymakers reach informed decisions.

    Weblink:
    http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/2005/RAND_MG218.pdf

    --

    Name: Effects of Arts Education on Participation in the Arts

    Year: 1996

    Description:
    This study examines the effects of arts education in determining subsequent arts participation. The report provides evidence that arts education is an even greater predictor of arts participation than general education. Louis Bergonzi and Julia Smith.

    Weblink:
    http://www.nea.gov/research/Researcharts/Summary36.html



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